Muziek

Razen - The Xvoto Reels

Humo CD-recensies - 19 September, 2017 - 13:05
Razen is het Brusselse collectief rond de multi-instrumentalisten Kim Delcour en Brecht Ameel dat al sinds 2010 minimalistische en drony muziekstukken bij elkaar improviseert.
Lees de bespreking
Categories: Muziek

Mount Kimbie - Love What Survives

Humo CD-recensies - 19 September, 2017 - 13:00
Mount Kimbie is een groep zonder businessplan, hun derde langspeler ‘Love What Survives’ is een rommeltje, en dat zijn wel degelijk twee complimenten.
Lees de bespreking
Categories: Muziek

Godspeed You! Black Emperor - Luciferian Towers

Humo CD-recensies - 19 September, 2017 - 12:46
Opener ‘Undoing a Luciferian Towers’ dronet op de tast in het rond met atypische blazers.
Lees de bespreking
Categories: Muziek

Spencer the Rover - The Late Album

Humo CD-recensies - 19 September, 2017 - 12:37
Iedereen die ooit heeft genoten van The Divine Comedy, XTC, Randy Newman, Electric Light Orchestra of de meer cinematografische songs van The Kinks of Scott Walker, zal ‘The Late Album’ van Spencer The Rover lusten, en in een rechtvaardige wereld hoor je dit elke dag op Radio 1.
Lees de bespreking
Categories: Muziek

Moses Sumney - Aromanticism

Humo CD-recensies - 19 September, 2017 - 12:31
Who the fuck is Moses Sumney? Al een tijdje geldt hij in bepaalde kringen als the next best thing, waardoor heel wat gevestigde muzikanten zich de voorbije jaren mecenasgewijs over hem wilden ontfermen. Hij mocht meezingen op de Solange-track ‘Mad’. James Blake en Sufjan Stevens namen hem mee op tournee. Hij maakte even deel uit van de Atomic Bomb! Band, de taskforce die David Byrne bij elkaar ronselde om William Onyeabor te eren. En Dave Sitek van TV On The Radio schonk hem een viersporenrecorder, waarmee Sumney zijn eerste EP opnam. Hij bedankt al die vriendendiensten nu met een flinke middelvinger. ‘Ik wil niet dat ‘Aromanticism’ geassocieerd wordt met Solange, Stevens of Sitek. Dit is míjn kind. Het heeft slechts één vader.’
Lees de bespreking
Categories: Muziek

Intergalactic Lovers - Exhale

Humo CD-recensies - 19 September, 2017 - 11:39
U kent ons: verzaakt een band aan zijn succesformule, dan kijven we, maar durven ze het aan om drie keer dezelfde plaat te maken, dan zijn we even onverbiddelijk.
Lees de bespreking
Categories: Muziek

Imogen Holst: String Chamber Music CD review – we owe it to ourselves to keep listening to her

The Guardian - Albumreviews - 18 September, 2017 - 10:18

Court Lane Music
(NMC)

Imogen Holst is in the blood of NMC records: in 1981 – three years before she died – she set up the foundation that would end up kickstarting the label eight years later. And even though the core remit of NMC is to champion living British composers, it also does a noble line in saving important recordings that fall through the cracks. The opening chords of this album (originally released in 2009 but already out of print) alone prove the point of rescuing it. Holst’s music is potently expressive and generous, reminiscent but never maudlin. “I’d much rather be dealing with crotchets and quavers than people,” she once told Britten, and although her music can be introverted, these superb performances by Court Lane Music make sure the huge warmth of the writing wins out. Holst was a lifelong advocate of other English composers; we owe it to her, and to ourselves, to keep listening to her brave and confessional works.


Continue reading...
Categories: Muziek

Foo Fighters: Concrete and Gold review – no reinventions, no crises of faith

The Guardian - Albumreviews - 17 September, 2017 - 04:00
The stadium rockers’ ninth album boasts impressive guests but few real departures from their trademark sound

Imagine all the world’s big rock bands adrift on a leaky raft. Supplies are low. Who’s shark bait? It’s a scenario sadly untestable in the field, but few rock fans would conceivably pick Foo Fighters over more divisive arena-fillers – Red Hot Chili Peppers, say, or U2.

Born from the ashes of Nirvana, but transformed into a juggernaut thanks to Dave Grohl’s grasp of melodics, the Foos are a reliable group who are hard to hate: power with tunes, good times with gravitas. For their ninth album, the first after a broken leg temporarily hobbled the irrepressible Grohl (“I feel the metal in my bones,” runs one wry lyric here), they have enlisted pop merchant Greg Kurstin (Adele, Katy Perry, Lily Allen; more recently, Liam Gallagher, Beck) to produce.

Continue reading...
Categories: Muziek

Telemann: Concertos for Many Instruments CD review – a timely reminder of greatness

The Guardian - Albumreviews - 17 September, 2017 - 03:00

Akademie für Alte Musik
(Harmonia Mundi)

The 250th anniversary of Telemann’s death has not been widely marked, but this scintillating disc should reassert his claim to be one of the most inventive composers of the 18th century. The colourfully varied collection of instruments on display include a mandolin, hammered dulcimer, harp and a special lute called a calchedon. There are braying horns and strident trumpets, while three perky oboes compete for attention with three violins in a memorably energetic B flat concerto I recall from Musica Antiqua Köln’s pioneering recording. The Berlin Akademie für Alte Musik, celebrating its own 35th year, adds sophistication and a dash of edgy charm to the period instrument sounds.

Continue reading...
Categories: Muziek

Ariel Pink: Dedicated to Bobby Johnson review – flashes of brilliance

The Guardian - Albumreviews - 17 September, 2017 - 03:00
(Mexican Summer)

Indie provocateur Ariel Pink’s visibility has depended on a willingness to say anything for attention, controversy overshadowing uncertain talent. His songs, like his interviews, often teeter on the unlistenable edge of annoying, but push past the weaponised irony and you’ll find Another Weekend and Feels Like Heaven are his most seductive melodies since breakthrough album Before Today. Elsewhere, joyous pile-up pop mixes the He-Man theme, lo-fi new wave and 60s psych inside a fairground ride. Time to Live is the Buggles covering the Velvets’ Sister Ray – in six minutes it veers from bracingly silly to grindingly tiresome to exhilarating brilliance, just like Pink himself.

Continue reading...
Categories: Muziek

Sløtface: Try Not to Freak Out review – polemics and partying

The Guardian - Albumreviews - 17 September, 2017 - 03:00

(Propeller)

Having attracted notoriety, and then fallen foul of social media safeguards, the band formerly known as Slutface reconfigured their name last year. Their sense of mischief remains intact, however. The Norwegian pop-punk outfit come out fighting on the nagging Magazine, a cheerful diatribe against the objectification of women: “Patti Smith would never put up with this shit,” sneers the chorus. They’re avowedly political, having protested over the contamination of a fjord in 2016, but just as irked by the glut of insipid male singer-songwriters (Nancy Drew). Songs like Pitted, meanwhile – which finds sweet-voiced singer Haley Shea giving props to Beyoncé, “doing [her] Hotline Bling thing” and wigging out to Bohemian Rhapsody – prove Sløtface are up for a party as well as polemic.

Continue reading...
Categories: Muziek

Princess Nokia: 1992 Deluxe review – confident and exciting hip-hop

The Guardian - Albumreviews - 17 September, 2017 - 03:00
(Rough Trade)

The much-hyped MC’s first outing on Rough Trade sears with her trademark eclectic vitality. 1992 Deluxe revisits last year’s 1992 mixtape, with remasters of original tracks plus seven new songs, all of which find her rapping over tantalising production with nonchalant confidence – whether it be a love letter to her native New York, a boisterous ode to witchcraft, a cool takedown of people trying to touch her hair, or even a surreal rendition of the Fast Food Song to close the album. One of the most exciting, assured hip-hop releases of the year, on which Princess Nokia asserts her claim to the throne.

Continue reading...
Categories: Muziek

Angus and Julia Stone: Snow review – dreamy Australian indie rock

The Guardian - Albumreviews - 17 September, 2017 - 03:00
(Because)

After years of contributing separate songs to their albums, Australian siblings Angus and Julia Stone were saved from splitting in 2014 when Rick Rubin suggested they write together. They’ve embraced co-writing fully on this self-produced record, where dreamy indie rock of songs such asChateau is shaded by the retro-summer Instagram filter as Beach House or the War on Drugs. It’s the psychological richness of different viewpoints coming together, the intimations of trouble in its sonic paradise, that lift it beyond pleasant, though: “I’ll sweep you off your feet and you will fall apart,” murmurs Julia on the title track, “Sweep you off the floor, oh God, you’re drunk again,” counters her brother.

Continue reading...
Categories: Muziek

Lizz Wright: Grace review – a potent, sanctified album

The Guardian - Albumreviews - 17 September, 2017 - 03:00

(Concord)

Over five albums 37-year-old Wright has emerged as the doyenne of current jazz singers, able to inhabit and transform songs from disparate genres. Grace is her homage to her native south (she grew up a minister’s daughter in Georgia), though its songs have diverse sources – Allen Toussaint’s Southern Nights and the antique Stars Fell on Alabama sit alongside kd laing and Bob Dylan. Wright and producer Joe Henry give it all a sanctified feel, however, bursting into full gospel choir for a title track, written as a torch song (by Rose Cousins, another Henry client) but here transformed into a plea for humanity. A potent brew.

Continue reading...
Categories: Muziek

Sam Braysher with Michael Kanan: Golden Earrings review – delightful

The Guardian - Albumreviews - 17 September, 2017 - 03:00

(Fresh Sound New Talent)

The American songbook has been given such a going-over by generations of jazz musicians that the songs themselves are often scarcely recognisable today. Braysher, a young British alto saxophonist, goes back to some original song sheets and tackles them afresh, along with a few venerable jazz standards. The results, played in his airy, vibrato-less tone, are both delightful and surprising. His partner in this venture is American pianist and song expert Michael Kanan. Together, they rediscover the pristine elegance of both melody and harmony in pieces by Jerome Kern, Irving Berlin and Nat King Cole, among others, and bring them to light through their own sensitive improvisations.

Continue reading...
Categories: Muziek

Yusuf/Cat Stevens: The Laughing Apple review – a late-career highlight

The Guardian - Albumreviews - 17 September, 2017 - 03:00
(Cat-O-Log/Decca)

Yusuf marks the 50th anniversary of his first two albums, both released in 1967, by reinterpreting some of his songs from the era, including four from New Masters and others never released at the time. It helps that he’s reunited with his old 1970s foils Alun Davies (guitar) and Paul Samwell-Smith (production), resulting in cleaner, less cluttered arrangements. Northern Wind, in particular, benefits, Yusuf’s gravelly, age-weathered voice now giving it a greater gravitas. The new songs are no less impressive, with the philosophical Don’t Blame Them unexpectedly changing gear towards its end. Throughout, there’s a disarming warmth and thoughtfulness, making for a pleasantly surprising late-career highlight.

Continue reading...
Categories: Muziek

Steve Elcock: Orchestral Music, Vol 1 CD review – a triumphant debut recording

The Guardian - Albumreviews - 17 September, 2017 - 03:00

Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra/Mann
(Toccata)

Steve Elcock (born 1957) is a phenomenon. With no conservatoire training, but obvious careful study, he has for years been quietly writing music of awesome power and majesty that has gone completely unheralded. Now, championed by the conductor Paul Mann, we can start to savour this extraordinary mind. This first disc features his dark, titanic Third Symphony, its unstoppable energy brilliantly captured by the RLPO. His Choses renversées par le temps ou la destruction pits fragile beauty against brute forces of ignorance, while his Festive Overture is a breathtakingly clever pastiche of Walton and Elgar. A triumphant debut recording.

Continue reading...
Categories: Muziek

Poulenc, Kodály, Janáček: Kyrie CD review – a tale of two masses

The Guardian - Albumreviews - 17 September, 2017 - 02:25

Choir of St John’s, Cambridge/Nethsingha
(Signum Classics)

Kodály’s Missa Brevis had its premiere in the cloakroom of the opera house in war-torn Budapest in 1945, with gunshots sounding in the streets outside. Poulenc’s Mass in G was written in 1937, when the composer was rediscovering his heavily scented religious faith: “I like an austerity that smells of orange blossom or jasmine,” he said, which could be a description of this work. These two contrasting masses and Janácek’s Lord’s Prayer (Otče náš) are sung with characteristic “European” ripeness of tone and precision by the choir of St John’s College, Cambridge, with Joseph Wicks and Glen Dempsey (organ) and Anne Denholm (harp). Excellent notes, too, from Richard Bratby and director Andrew Nethsingha. Another worthwhile disc from this top collegiate choir.

Continue reading...
Categories: Muziek

Björk: “The Gate”

Pitchfork - Best New Tracks - 15 September, 2017 - 11:30

The lead single from Björk’s forthcoming, as-yet-untitled album

Categories: Muziek

Ariel Pink: Dedicated to Bobby Jameson

Pitchfork - Best new Albums - 15 September, 2017 - 01:00

Refining the gonzo pop-collages of his previous work, Ariel Pink crafts an immersive, intimate record marked by solitude.

Categories: Muziek

Pages